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Press Release

October 15, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Bailey Lindgren ([email protected])
952-838-9000, National toll-free (888) 248-0822

Students, Schools and Communities Go Orange on Unity Day, Wednesday, Oct. 22 to Help Prevent Bullying


MINNEAPOLIS: What do orange cookies, an enormous Green Giant statue sporting an orange toga, and Ellen DeGeneres wearing orange on national TV have in common? These are all ways people have celebrated Unity Day, a national event developed by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center to show support for students who are bullied. This year, students, schools, organizations, businesses, and communities across the country will wear orange in support of Unity Day on Wednesday, Oct. 22.

“Unity Day is a great time to send an orange message of solidarity against bullying,” said Paula Goldberg, PACER Center’s executive director. “We encourage everyone to come together in schools, communities, and online to unite against bullying. When we stand together, no one has to stand alone.”

Unity Day began in 2011 as part of National Bullying Prevention Month which was launched by PACER in 2006. DeGeneres showed her support by wearing orange and speaking out against bullying on her show Ellen in front of millions of viewers. In 2012, journalist Anderson Cooper encouraged viewers of Anderson Live to participate, and in 2013 the 55-foot tall Green Giant statue in Blue Earth, Minn., wore an orange toga to commemorate the day. This year, schools and communities across the country are planning more unique ways to “Make It Orange and Make It End,” including selling orange cookies, wearing orange ribbons, and releasing orange balloons.

There are many ways to show support on Unity Day and throughout October:

Wear orange: People can send a message of unity and support by wearing an orange T-shirt, tie, hat, wristband, socks, or even shoelaces.

Unite on social media: PACER has created a Unity Day Facebook event that people can “Attend” and “Share,” and Unity Day updates and photos can be shared on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #UnityDay2014.

Discuss Unity in the classroom: Teachers can hold a classroom discussion about unity and PACER has created a four-page guide to celebrating Unity Day with young students.

Visit PACER’s mobile-friendly websites for teens and kids: PACER recently redesigned and upgraded its two popular websites PACERKidsAgainstBullying.org and PACERTeensAgainstBullying.org.

Become a champion against bullying: Many nonprofits, schools, and community groups collaborate with PACER during National Bullying Prevention Month, including National Education Association, American Federation for Teachers, and the National PTA. Organizations can become a champion and join this expanded bullying prevention effort.

“Choose Kindness” is part of Disney ABC Television Group’s efforts to create a bullying prevention campaign to encourage kids and parents around the country to help put an end to bullying by choosing kindness. PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center are among its partners. As part of this initiative, Disney Channel will air special, themed episodes of “Girl Meets World” on Friday, October 17 at 8 p.m. ET/PT and “Austin & Ally” Saturday, October 18 at 8 p.m. ET/PT. 

Unlock items in Disney Club Penguin: Players can unlock an orange T-shirt and a megaphone with code 2BEHEARD to rally in support of Unity Day. For every megaphone and orange T-shirt unlocked in-game, Club Penguin will donate $1 (up to $50,000) to support bullying prevention.

Additionally, Club Penguin has teamed with 14-year-old Alex Angelo, host of Radio Disney’s “Saturday Night Party” with Alex Angelo (Saturdays, 8:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. ET / 5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. PT), who is a big supporter of the bullying prevention cause. Watch Alex’s video as he shares the message to “Be Heard” and stand up against bullying.

To learn more about these opportunities, visit PACER.org/Bullying.

About PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center: Founded in 2006, PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center actively leads social change, so that bullying is no longer considered an accepted childhood rite of passage. PACER provides innovative resources for students, parents, educators, and others, and recognizes bullying as a serious community issue that impacts education, physical and emotional health, and the safety and well-being of students. PACER offers tools to address bullying in schools, the community, and online. For more information, visit PACER.org/Bullying.

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