Skip to main content
Video: Imagine
Video: Club Penguin Supports Bullying Prevention Month
Video: Stronger by Time for Three
Video: Matt the Film
Video: What Teens Say
Video: What Experts Say
Video: Butterfly by Lizzy SiderLearn More

Your Story is Powerful!

Hi! We are Michael and Marisa, teen spokespersons for PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.

During the month of October, we are encouraging all teens to share their story. Selected stories will be posted to the website and one will be chosen at random to receive a MacBook Air!

Unity Day T-shirts:

CustomInk Launches Its Fourth Annual “Be Good To Each Other” T-shirt campaign in support of PACER

This year, PACER’s UNITY DAY will take place on Wednesday, October 22, the day when everyone is encouraged to come together and wear orange to send a message of support, hope and unity. Though ordering in time for Unity day has closed, you can still support the cause! CustomInk will donate 100% of profits (at least $9.00 per shirt) to PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.

Add Your Comment

I Care Because

I have been bullied many times people have called me fat and gay and it herts but my teachers and parents helped.

Allie, 12, VA

The effects of bullying can be long-lasting and extremely harmful.  Long-term depression, self-esteem issues, and social anxiety can become crippling mental health issues.  It is a blow to self-esteem, to security, to civility.  The responsibility belongs to all of us: Report bullying if you see it.  Talk to somebody if you?re being bullied.  Stand up against it.  Stand up for each other. 

Talya, 34, San Francisco, CA

Oh my gosh, there are so many reasons. I wasn't really bullied but I saw it happen way too often. ONCE is too often in my view. Anyway, ever since I was in First Grade bullies have made me angry. Not because they were bullying me, it was just because I saw what they did to other kids and it was just not right to treat another human being that way. I decided I was going to do something different and stand up for the victims of these punks.

I also knew that for me to just be mean to them was not what I wanted to do either. A bunch of these bullies were on the baseball team with me. I decided to write a note explaining how much they were hurting these innocent kids with their words and that just because they were popular kids with lots of friends didn't give them the right to hurt others. I taped a letter to every boy on my team's locker. A bunch of them told me they really didn't realize how much hurt they were causing other kids.

What I'm saying here is don't be a bystander.  I beg you to take action and be a hero to a victim of bullying. If you get that feeling you should do something, please do it! Even if you don't feel safe standing up to a bully, saying something to a victim literally might save their life! Be a friend to a kid who desperately needs one.

Andrew, 30, Ohio/ Southwestern

I know the feeling of being cut down by the things you're most self concious of and wishing your teacher wouldn't turn they're head the other way. The feeling of being taunted because your small and easy to intimidate. To have nasty rumors spread causing friends question you. Bullying is relentless and I'm lucky to have had a few friends who knew me and backed me up to helped end my bully's attempts to ruin me. Bullying effects so many people's lives and I'm happy to be a single voice of many against bullying.

Katie, 17, Tx

I was the bullied last year and I want to stop it. I came home and cried myself to sleep. I have also bullied someone. I was about 6 at the time and my friend had dragged me into it because she didn't like the person. I regret it and even though we're friends now, it haunts me.

Maddie, 10, Tronto

Read More | Add Your Comment

Color Key
 
Featured Articles Related Event
 
Website feature

In The News

Finally, signs that crusaders against bullying are getting the upper hand

Posted: Thursday, October 23, 2014

By Debra-Lynn B. Hook of McClatchy-Tribune News Service

National Bullying Prevention Center Director Julie Hertzog is quoted in a Ledger-Enquirer article about the increasing awareness around bullying prevention and resulting changes in bullying reporting at schools. “The awareness is out there in a way it wasn’t before,” said Hertzog. “We’ve reframed the way people are thinking about bullying. We no longer say, ‘Oh, that’s just kids being kids.’ Now we understand the impact — everything from not wanting to go to school, to feeling unsafe, to anxiety and depression, to self-harm.” Read more>>>

U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights Issues Guidance on Bullying of Students with Disabilities

Posted: Thursday, October 23, 2014

As part of PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Month, the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) today issued guidance to schools reminding them that bullying is wrong and must not be tolerated — including against America’s 6.5 million students with disabilities.

The Department issued guidance in the form of a letter to educators detailing public schools’ responsibilities. If a student with a disability is being bullied, federal law requires schools to take immediate and appropriate action to investigate the issue and, as necessary, take steps to stop the bullying and prevent it from recurring. Learn more>>>

Students, community members take a stand against bullying as part of Unity Day

Posted: Thursday, October 23, 2014

By Kim McGuire, Star Tribune

If it seems like you're seeing orange everywhere you go today, there’s a reason: Unity Day. Started just three years ago by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center, Unity Day has become a national movement in which everyone is encouraged to wear orange and support local anti-bullying efforts. And it’s not just students. Expect to see more orange if you’re driving over the I-35W bridge tonight. The I-35W bridge will again be lit orange at sunset in observance of Unity Day. Read more>>>

Read More Newslines

Support PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center

Join Survey Monkey Contribute

PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center is excited to announce our new partnership with SurveyMonkey Contribute and a new way for anyone to give thier support! Sign up and you will receive surveys by e-mail from SurveyMonkey customers who need your opinion. For every survey you take, SurveyMonkey will donate $0.50 to PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center, and you'll get a chance to win $100 in an instant-win game.

text-donate

All About Bullies . . . Big And Small

A CD for young children, and winner of a Grammy for Best Children’s Album, All About Bullies … Big and Small is a collection of music, poetry and storytelling designed to put an interesting and heartfelt twist on bullying prevention, so that young learners can identify with the topic in an age appropriate manner. The artists all generously contributed their time and talents. 100% of the profit proceeds are donated to PACER’s Kids Against Bullying initiatives.