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Introduction to Bullying Prevention Classroom Toolkit

Looking for a way to introduce bullying prevention and awareness into your classroom, school, or community organization? The Introduction to Bullying Prevention Toolkit contains daily learning opportunities and several options of engaging activities to get students talking about bullying. The toolkit provides the basics about bullying and sets the stage for student-supported initiatives.

Monday
All Ages
Discuss each of the following questions: What is bullying? What is cyberbullying? Why do students bully? Why are students targeted by bullying? Make sure that each student is allowed the opportunity to respond.
Activity:
Record the question and the responses on poster-size paper and post them on the classroom wall or in the hallway.

Elementary School
As a class, talk about what bullying is, using the Bullying 101 guide (pages 1-7).

Middle and High School
As a class, talk about what bullying is, using the Bullying 101 guide. There are a lot of myths about bullying. Discuss with students what they’ve heard about bullying and what they think is true or false.
Activity: In small groups, have students take the Definitely True or No Way quiz.

Tuesday
All Ages:
Discuss each of the following questions: What can students do to help? What can adults in the school do to help? What can parents to do help? Make sure that each student is allowed the opportunity to respond.
Activity: Record the question and the responses on poster-size paper and post them on the classroom wall or in the hallway.

Elementary School:
Read The Legend of Spookley the Square Pumpkin by Joe Troiano to students.
Activity: Use the Stop Bullying Before it Starts toolkit. Activities include discussions, art projects, and other creative options.

Middle and High School
As a class, talk about what it means to have legal protections. Develop 3-4 things students think a law against bullying should have/do.
Activity: Divide students into groups and instruct each group to use the information provided on these pages: Know Your Rights and StopBullying.gov to develop a summary of their state’s laws. Evaluate how well the state’s law fits the criteria developed by the class. Ask each group to come up with 3-4 suggestions to improve the law. 

 

Wednesday
Elementary School:

Option 1: Read “The Bully in the Mirror.”

The Bully in the Mirror
Antonio, 4th Grade
Mirror Mirror on the wall why must I be the
Bully that has to fall. I beat on kids around the school
The mirror told me it wasn’t cool. The mirror told me to change.
My ways I have beat up kids all by days. I have no friends
It’s just not right. The mirror said cause you like to fight.
I am a bully how could this be. The mirror is starting to
Change me. Reflection are now flashing back to me.
Someone plant the seed inside of me. Now the mirror has
shown me poor. I’ll change my ways and start
new days the bully is no more part of me.
Any bully can change.

Activity: Ask each student to write a letter to the author, telling them what they would like them to know. These letters may contain personal content, so posting responses to a wall is optional.

Option 2:
Pick out 3-6 stories from Real Kids Speak Out. Depending on the age of students, either read stories out loud or distribute copies to small groups to read together.
Activity: Ask each student (or group) to write a letter to the author of the story. What do they want the author to know? What could they say to make the author feel better?

Middle and High School:
Option 1: Read “A Letter to a Bully.”
Activity: Ask each student to write a letter to the author, telling them what they would like them to know. These letters may contain personal content, so posting responses to a wall is optional.

Option 1:
In small groups, choose a story from the Teens Against Bullying You’re Note Alone feature that resonates with you.
Activity: Discuss with the group what you would like to say to the author of the story – what advice would you give them, what do you want them to know, etc.

Thursday
All Ages
Review some of the  “I Care Because” statements submitted by kids and teens around the world:

Activity: Create a classroom mural, with “I Care about Bullying Prevention Because . . . .” written in the center. Ask each student to add his or her reason.

Elementary School
Explore the online Learning with the Club Crew activity with students.

Middle and High School
In small groups, ask students to read through Reasons Teens Don’t Tell.
Activity: For each reason, ask the group to develop 1-2 things adults could do to make it easier for students to tell.

Friday 
All Ages
Discuss what can be done in your school to prevent bullying.
Activity: Record the ideas. Have the students present them to your guidance counselor or principal.

Activity: Complete the Above the Line/Below the Line activity. Together, talk about what “above the line” behaviors and “below the line” behaviors are at school. Ask students to commit to promoting “above the line” behaviors within their classroom and school.

Elementary School
Along with committing to these positive behaviors, take the “Kids Against Bullying” pledge. Students can also set up a table at school where peers can sign paper copies of the pledge.

Middle and High School
Sign the online “Together Against Bullying” pledge or set up a table at your school where students can sign paper copies of the pledge.